The National Broadband Plan

In “Why Obama is In the Lead on High-Speed Internet Access Policy,” I implied that things had dramatically changed in national telecommunications policy since the release of the National Broadband Plan in March 2010. I don’t want to leave the impression that the National Broadband Plan was anything other than extraordinary. It represented the culmination of [...]

Reclaiming the Narrative

President Obama is about to speak to the largest audience he will have for a while. He’s a communicator at heart, a gifted, graceful writer and a powerful speaker. He wants to control his narrative legacy, and Tuesday night is one of the last opportunities he will have to shape his story in public before [...]

Fiber by cities: Washington DC, San Francisco, Seattle

Although everyone thinks of high-speed, high-capacity Internet access as a “must have” — a utility — the entire highly-concentrated information-transport industry in the US can set prices and determine the quality of their services at will. With the exception of the 16M households that will have access to (expensive) Verizon FiOS services — and can [...]

Stockholm and Leverett: Case Studies in Fiber Deployment

Tomorrow morning I’ll end a two-week research trip to Copenhagen, Berlin, Amsterdam, and Stockholm, and fly home. It’s been quite a journey, and I’ll be thinking about it for years to come. I was on several quests, focusing on government innovation, fiber policy, and the effect of high-capacity communications on peoples’ lives. Later posts and [...]

Verizon v. FCC: Why It Matters

Tomorrow, Monday, Sept. 9, the D.C. Circuit will hear argument in Verizon v. FCC. [FCC links here to filings in the case - scroll down. I was involved in the 'Natl Assn of Telecomms Officers Assn' amicus brief. The remarks below were prepared for a public session in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 5, for which [...]

NYT

It’s the first day of school for me here in NYC, and I enjoyed talking to students about the truly excellent three-part NYT series on ESPN that ran this week. The articles were full of useful detail - ESPN as puppeteer, setting times and creating contests - and should raise student heartbeats by invoking billions and billions [...]