The Diane Rehm Show (NPR): Discussing the Future of Television

August 13 – A fight over fees paid to transmit CBS content to Time Warner Cable customers has left millions of viewers without access to the channel. It has also drawn attention to long-standing tensions over how television is produced, packaged and priced. A small but growing number of Americans have cut their cable cords and cancelled satellite transmissions. Instead, they are taking advantage of new technology to customize their viewing experience at a lower cost. Non-traditional companies are entering the TV production business and competing with traditional broadcasters. For…

The Monopoly Telecom Industry

Check out Susan’s dialogue with Holistic Survival’s Jason Hartman about the Federal Communications Commission’s responsibility to the American people with respect to free Wifi. “Crawford believes the telecom industry now has a monopoly. American are paying much more for Internet access yet getting much less. Other countries are beating America in this space”.

Bloomberg TV: ‘Duopoly With a Fringe’ for AT&T, Verizon: Crawford

July 23 (Bloomberg) — Bloomberg View columnist Susan Crawford discusses the battle for spectrum in the wireless industry as AT&T and Verizon outpace all competitors. She speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg Surveillance.” Bloomberg TV: ‘Duopoly With a Fringe’ for AT&T, Verizon: Crawford

Bloomberg TV: Profusek Says Dell Breakup – Fee Discord a ‘Sideshow’

July 23 (Bloomberg) — Robert Profusek, head of the mergers and acquisition practice at Jones Day, talks about the outlook for the sale of Dell Inc. to founder Michael Dell and Silver Lake Management LLC. He speaks with Tom Keene, Sara Eisen and Susan Crawford on Bloomberg Television’s “Surveillance.” (Crawford is a Bloomberg View columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. Source: Bloomberg) Watch Susan express her views with Tom Keene, Sara Eisen and Robert Profusek on Bloomberg TV  

Book TV After Words: Susan Crawford, “Captive Audience”

“Ms. Crawford argues that the U.S. has lost its competitive advantage in the knowledge-based economy, because it is no longer at the forefront of the internet revolution. Other countries have internet capabilities that are significantly faster and less expensive to use than in the States. This puts U.S. consumers at a distinct disadvantage and, she argues, it also threatens America’s economic future. She discusses her findings with Andrew Blum, author of ‘Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet’”.

IMLS, USCIS to Make Announcement at ALA Conference

American Library Association’s Larra Clark, Director of OITP’s Program on Networks the Program on America’s Libraries for the 21st Century (AL21C), announces the upcoming presenters  for the 2013 National Conference. “A frequent media commentator and Internet activist, Crawford will explore themes outlined in her new book “Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age.” Of particular interest to librarians, Crawford examines how powerful telecommunications monopolies stymie policy efforts to improve Internet access at affordable rates”. 

Digital Communications in the United States: Should Broadband Communications be a Public Utility Service?

The Division of Ratepayer Advocates (DRA) will host a thought provoking presentation and dialogue with Susan Crawford, who will speak on the current status of broadbandcommunications in the United States including the state of competition, affordability, availability of high speed internet, and whether cities should be allowed to build their own municipal fiber broadband networks. Questions for the Forum may be posted on Twitter using #DRAForum

Mozilla: Book Salon & Reception for Susan Crawford

Please join Roosevelt Institute Fellow Susan Crawford and the Mozilla Policy & Mozilla Ignite teams for a book salon and reception to discuss her new book, Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age. It is the story of how consumers, let down by deregulatory government policies, are losing the fight for affordable, high-speed Internet access in America. Susan Crawford Book Salon & Reception — Wine, beer, and hors d’oeuvres Mon., May 13 5:30 – 7:30 PM SF Office, Common Space 6:00 – 7:00 PM…

First Steps to Open Gov – getting your ducts in a row

(Feb. 13, 2013) As city leaders focus on making their administrations more innovative, efficient, transparent, open to outside expertise, and better at service delivery, they’re going to need cheaper and continually-higher-capacity, high-speed Internet access. And their communities are going to need the same thing.  

Killing Program Access and Broadband Competition

Another Friday filing by the FCC: 146 pages on program access.It’s a classic on-the-one-hand-on-the-other item. This time around it’s even worse for the public, because the underlying competitive reality of the wires that run to American homes is being hidden, in two ways: First, the entire discussion is focused on the market for pay-TV, because that’s the subject of the rules being examined. That’s the wrong market definition from a consumer’s point of view. Consumers are buying both data and video in bundles, and in that bundled marketplace we don’t…

While we’re waiting

Back in early July, we heard that the McCain tech policy (eight months behind the Obama tech policy) was going to be released in… July. It’s August, it’s humid, and no policy. We can predict to some extent what the in-process policy will say. The bottom line: Sen. Obama sees the promise of technology. He understands that technology policy should be closely tied to this country’s economic policy, because technology may provide answers — solutions — for our sagging standing in the world. Sen. McCain, from all we can tell,…

We won’t defer when you’re wrong

When should a court defer to an agency’s interpretation of its governing statute and/or its own regulatory actions? I got interested in this question because deference by a flummoxed Supreme Court gave us Brand X, with its ahistorical “this looks really tricky so we’ll let the FCC categorize highspeed internet access” approach. In this week’s Third Circuit opinion about the Janet Jackson Super Bowl incident, the court doesn’t defer much. At least three times, it corrects the FCC’s reinterpretation of past regulation. 1. FCC: We gave notice of and a…