The rock star, the Christian Coalition, and NN

Yesterday’s House Judiciary hearing (witness statements and archived video here) had a deeply political angle – what committee should have jurisdiction over network neutrality issues – but also revealed to me that: We’re seeing the moment when Hollywood, law enforcement, and the network access providers publicly attempt to join hands in favor of monitored/monetized network access. I loved meeting Damian Kulash and hearing him testify.  His opposite number (for purposes of the hearing) was the president of the Songwriters Guild, Rick Carnes.  Carnes was there to talk about piracy, p2p…

Meta moment

I did a short segment on NPR’s Bryant Park Project with Rachel Martin this morning – for broadcast tomorrow, Tuesday.  The plan had been to talk about the Cuba OFAC story from last week.  But when I got there they had switched gears – they really wanted to talk about net neutrality instead. So we did an interview about everything.  We talked about registrars freezing web site registrations at the direction of the Treasury Department, about a judge knocking Wikileaks off the internet, and about network access providers filtering/managing internet…

Prior restraints

The odd story of the Wikileaks.org injunction is described here by the Berkman Center’s Citizen Media project. We still don’t know exactly why the site was ordered taken down – it seems like a trade secret issue – or why this was done ex parte, or why the court initially ordered wikileaks.org’s registrar/host to “immediately clear and remove all DNS hosting records for the wikileaks.org domain name and prevent the domain name from resolving to the wikileaks.org website or any other website or server other than a blank park page,…

Filtering holiday

In preparation for the Olympics, China announces that it is thinking about weakening the Great Firewall.  And that it may allow access to the BBC. Meanwhile, the Federal Times reports that our U.S. State Dept. is planning to hand out $15 million to developers to “produce ‘Internet technology programs and protocols’ that enable ‘widespread and secure Internet use’ in countries where the Internet is now heavily censored.”:  As one of my colleages said today, it’s Voice of America in software form. But – wait – it’s not all free-flow-bliss out…