San Francisco reveals latest #Resist effort – resisting sub-gigabit internet access

March 15, 2017 – This Tuesday, almost a year to the day later, Crawford attempted a little bit of history rewriting when she wrote that “Google Fiber was doomed from the start.” She outlined her view that the answer was never going to be a for-profit company but will require local, state and eventually federal policies and massive investment to install a whole new infrastructure akin to subway systems, railways, and telephone networks.

Advisory panel revives San Francisco’s citywide gigabit fiber plans

March 14, 2017 – “Without local government involvement, no private company is going to find it in its interest to provide, to sell internet access in a way that promotes economic development and social justice for any city,” Crawford told StateScoop. The city has been too “politically hamstrung” during past efforts to launch this infrastructure, she said, but the national attitude toward fiber has matured.

Panel to study wiring San Francisco with high-speed Internet

March 14, 2017 – Crawford called Internet access the “the key economic and social justice issue of the 21st century. Whether it’s educating kids, providing advanced health care, moderating our use of energy and making it possible for people to work where they live — all of that is going to be helped by a better, faster and far cheaper data network,” she said.

What could happen to net neutrality under the new FCC?

March 9, 2017 – Susan Crawford, co-director of Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, says it’s “extremely unlikely” that freeing internet providers from Title II regulation will spur more competition. “We have a very broken marketplace in the United States, and absent government intervention, there’s no reason that would change,” she explains. “There’s no real competition to the local cable actor in most American places.”

Trump could electrify local broadband or decimate competition

December 7, 2016- “This is a moment for the happy warriors of telecom policy to get out there and organize and be a part of the infrastructure deal for the Trump administration,” said Susan Crawford. “As we build roads and bridges and tunnels, we can include fiber that’s open access. That’s what I’m dreaming of, and that’s where we need to go.”

Washington Post: Controversy Over Facebook’s Free Internet

October 6, 2016-“Zero-rating is pernicious, unfair and unnecessary,” said Susan Crawford, a law professor at Harvard who has advocated for strong regulation of the broadband industry. Permitting the practice would simply enable “the gameplaying of companies who have a strong interest in maintaining the status quo.”

Marketplace Tech: Cable Giants Call Off Merger

April 24, 2015–Listen to the news segment here.  “All that scale would give Comcast enormous discretion over what reaches Americans, what Americans pay, information flows, customer service—really unlimited power,” says Susan Crawford is co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.

Verizon v. FCC: Why It Matters

Tomorrow, Monday, Sept. 9, the D.C. Circuit will hear argument in Verizon v. FCC. [FCC links here to filings in the case – scroll down. I was involved in the ‘Natl Assn of Telecomms Officers Assn’ amicus brief. The remarks below were prepared for a public session in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 5, for which CSPAN has video here.] There’s a spray of issues in telecommunications policy and law, and lots of acronyms and shiny objects. So it should be a relief to people here that the case being considered by…

Book TV After Words: Susan Crawford, “Captive Audience”

“Ms. Crawford argues that the U.S. has lost its competitive advantage in the knowledge-based economy, because it is no longer at the forefront of the internet revolution. Other countries have internet capabilities that are significantly faster and less expensive to use than in the States. This puts U.S. consumers at a distinct disadvantage and, she argues, it also threatens America’s economic future. She discusses her findings with Andrew Blum, author of ‘Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet’”.