Bazelon, Abrams, Brill, and Liptak

This afternoon at the Yale Law School reunion the “Next Generation of Law and Media” panel was noteworthy. So I did my best to take some notes. All the alums on the panel expressed concern about the effect of the internet on mainstream media, but two (Emily Bazelon and Adam Liptak) see a helpful relationship between the online world and journalism. All of the speakers were worried about the economic model for newspapers. Brill, in particular, was pushing for new legal protection of mainstream media companies (MSM, in shorthand below),…

Sputnik and Arpanet

Fifty years ago today, the USSR launched Sputnik, the first artificial earth satellite. On February 7, 1958 (just a few months later, and arguably directly in response to the launch of Sputnik), the U.S. Department of Defense issued directive 5105.15 establishing the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA). Four years later, J.C.R. Licklider was chosen to run ARPA computer research. Read The Dream Machine for the rest of the story. Here’s Vermeer’s Navigator, on view here in Frankfurt at the Städel Museum – a Licklider from a different time: Clinton Blasts…

How newspapers and broadcasters are different

The advent of the digital age has put both newspapers and television broadcasters — until not too long ago the arbiters of opinion and taste in America — under pressure. It’s hard for hardcopy newspapers to survive in a craigslist time, and they generally can’t force people to pay for their content online. It’s hard for broadcasters to differentiate their offerings, and so they are starting to release shows online. But newspapers (unlike broadcasters) seem to get the idea that they’re better off with an open internet than a closed,…