P2P traffic standards

Someone pointed me today to an IETF workshop held last week at MIT (announcement here) about possible standard-setting activities focused on P2P issues. The workshop was prompted by the Comcast/BitTorrent experience. This is a good development, in my view. Putting aside the policy implications of the Comcast situation (and the question whether the FCC has or should have jurisdiction to do anything about that situation), the key problem for the globally interoperable internet as a whole is whether network operators are adhering to internet standards. The cable networking standard, DOCSIS,…

Three updates

Three stories moved forward today: 1. Verizon dropped its legal challenge to the 700 MHz auction rules. I have a feeling they’ve decided that there are ways to work around [link to post giving work-around clues] the no-locking, no-blocking conditions that the FCC established. Plus VZ doesn’t want to be the bad guy, charged by Congress with delaying the auction. They’ve got bigger problems on their hands given the NARAL flap and the fact that… 2. Comcast admitted “delaying” traffic on its network. I learned today that EFF had been…

Comcast Is Pretending to be You

This AP story makes clear that Comcast is pretending to be part of online conversations in order to frustrate users who want to use particular online applications. This happens all the time in the name of “traffic shaping” — it’s the kind of thing that China does to interfere with internet use. What’s different and important about today’s story is that people have carefully experimented. We can now understand exactly what Comcast is doing. When you go online and click a link, what you’re doing is sending packets (think individual…